April 18, 2014
Meditation and Kundalini awakening Classes 27 th of april to 2nd may at Howrah india calcutt

https://www.facebook.com/events/301552460000875/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming

April 18, 2014
jagadeesh krishnan

love is therapy, and there is no other therapy in the world except love. It is always love that heals, because love makes you whole. Love makes you feel welcome in the world. Love makes you a part of existence; it destroys alienation. Then you are no more an outsider here, but utterly needed. Love makes you feel needed, and to be needed is the greatest need. Nothing else can fulfill that great need. Unless you feel that you are contributing something to existence, unless you feel that without you the existence would be a little less, that you would be missed, that you are irreplaceable, you will not feel healthy and whole.
And prayer is the highest form of love. If love is the flower, then prayer is the fragrance. Love is visible, prayer is invisible. Love is between one person and another person, prayer is between one impersonal presence and the impersonal presence of the whole. Love is limited, prayer is unlimited.
If you can pray, no other therapy is needed.
Therapies are needed in the world because prayer has disappeared. Man was never in need of therapy when prayer was alive, flowing, when people were dancing in great gratitude, singing songs in praise of God, were ecstatic just for being, for being here, were grateful just for life. When tears were flowing from their eyes — of love, of joy — and when there were songs in their hearts, there was no need for therapy.
Therapy is a modern need, a poor substitute for prayer. Psychoanalysis is a poor substitute for religion, very poor. But when you cannot get the best, then you settle for second-best or the third-best, or whatsoever is available. Because temples have become rotten, churches have become political, religion has been contaminated by the priests, man is left alone, uncared for, with nobody to support him. The very ground on which he has been standing for centuries has disappeared. He is falling in an abyss, feeling uprooted. Psychoanalysis comes as a substitute: it gives you a little bit of rooting, it gives you a little bit of ground to hold onto, but it is nothing compared to prayer. Because the psychoanalyst himself is in need, he himself is as ill as the patient, there is not much difference between the psychoanalyst and the patient. If there is any difference, that difference is of knowledge — and that makes no difference at all. It is not a difference of being. If there is any difference it is quantitative, it is not that of quality, and quantity does not make much difference. The psychoanalyst and his patient are both in the same boat.
In the o]d days there was a different kind of person moving in the world, the religious person — the Buddha, the Christ. His very presence was healing. Because he was healed and whole, his wholeness was contagious. Just as diseases are contagious, so is health. Just as illnesses can be caught from others, so can you catch something of the healing energy from the other. But for that, the psychoanalyst will not be of much help. He may help a little bit to solve your problems intellectually. He may find out the causes of your problems — and when you know the cause you feel a little better, you are not in ignorance — but just by knowing the cause nothing is helped. You are suffering: the psychoanalyst will show that you are suffering because of your mother, because of your upbringing, because of your childhood. It makes you feel a little good: so it is not you who is the cause, it is the mother. Or, there is always something else you can put blame on. Psychoanalysis shifts the responsibility, makes you feel a little weightless, unburdened, but the problem is not solved. Just by knowing the cause, the cause does not disappear.

MORALITY

Last week we completed our survey of the Four Noble Truths and in so doing the last topic that we dealt with was the Noble Eightfold Path to the end of suffering. We used the analogy of mountain climbing when we talked about treading the Eightfold Path to the end of suffering. We have said that just as when one climbs a mountain the first step depends on the last, the last depends on the first because we have to have our eyes firmly fixed on the summit of the mountain and yet we also have to be careful not to stumble while taking the first few steps up to the mountain path. So here in climbing a mountain, each portion of the path depends on the other portions. In this sense, regarding the Noble Eightfold Path, all the steps of the path are interrelated, are dependent on one another. We cannot do away with any one step. Nonetheless, for practical purposes the eight steps of the path have been divided into three ways of practice, or three divisions of training. These three divisions are good conduct or morality (Shila), mental development or meditation (Samadhi) and finally wisdom or insight (Prajna). Although conceptually and structurally, the first step depends upon the last and the last depends upon the first; although they are dependent on one another, still in practical terms when one climbs a mountain one has to climb the lowest slope first. One may be attracted to the summit, but in order to get there one has to cover the lower slope first. It is for this very practical reason that we find the eight steps of the Eightfold Path grouped into these three ways of practice.

The first of these three ways is good conduct. Good conduct forms a foundation for further progress on the path, for further personal development. It is said that just as the earth is the base of all animate and inanimate things, so is morality the foundation of all qualities. When we look around us we can see that everything rests upon the earth, whether it be the building, whether it be the tree and bush, or whether it be the animal. The earth is the foundation, and in the same manner morality is the foundation of all qualities, all virtues, all attainments ranging from the mundane to the supra-mundane, ranging from success, good fortune all the way up to skill in meditation, wisdom and enlightenment. Through this metaphor, we can under-stand the importance of good conduct as a foundation for following the path, as a basis for achieving results on the path.

Why do we take time to stress the importance of good conduct as a foundation for progress on the path? The reason is that there is a tendency to think of good conduct as rather boring, rather dull. Meditation sounds more exciting and interesting. Philosophy has a kind of fascination about it. There is a dangerous tendency to neglect the importance of good conduct and to go to the more exciting parts of the path. But if we do not create this foundation of good conduct, we will not succeed in treading the other parts of the path.

We have to understand the way in which the precepts or the rules of good conduct are established within Buddhism because there are various ways in which moral or ethical codes are established. If you look at the moral codes of the major religions, you will find that there is a surprising correspondence. If you look at the moral teachings of Confucius, of Lao Tzu, of the Buddha, of Hindu teachers, Christians, Muslims, and Jews, you will find that regarding the basic rules of morality, there is a large degree of correspondence. But while the rules in many cases correspond, the attitude, the ways in which the rules are presented, understood and interpreted differ considerably from religion to religion. Essentially, to generalize, there are two ways in which moral codes can be established. One way we might call the authoritarian way, and the other we might call the democratic way. And a good example of the first is God’s handing down the Ten Commandments to Moses on the mountain. On the other hand in Buddhism, I think what we have here might be called a democratic way of establishing the rules of good conduct. You might wonder why I say that. After all we do have the rules of good conduct laid down in scriptures. So you might ask is this not similar to God’s handing down the tablets to Moses? But I think this is not really so because if we look closely at the scriptures, we do find what lies behind the rules of good conduct, and the principles that lie behind that are the foundation of the rules of good conduct, are the principles of equality and reciprocity.

What equality means is that all living beings are equal in their essential attitudes. In other words, all living beings want to be happy. They fear pain, death and suffering. All want to live, to enjoy happiness and security. And this is also true to all living beings just as it is true to ourselves. We can call this equality the great universality of the Buddhist vision in which all living beings are equal. On the basis of this equality, we are encouraged to act with the awareness of reciprocity.

Reciprocity means that just as we would not like to be killed, robbed, abused and so forth, so would all other living beings not like to have these things happen to them. One can put this principle of reciprocity quite simply by saying “do not act towards others in a way which you would not want them to act towards you”. Given these principles of equality and reciprocity, it is not hard to see how they stand behind, how they create the foundation for the rules of good conduct.

Let us now look specifically at the contents of good conduct in Buddhism. The way of practice of good conduct includes three parts of the Noble Eightfold Path, and these three parts are Right Speech, Right Action, and Right Livelihood. Speech is an extremely important part of our life. We often tend to underestimate the power of speech. We often tend to exercise very little control over our faculty of speech. This should not be so. We have all been very greatly hurt by someone’s words at some time of our life. And similarly, we have been encouraged by the words of another. In the sphere of politics, we can see how those who are able to communicate effectively are able to influence people tremendously for better or for worse. Hitler, Churchill, Martin Luther King were all accomplished speakers who were able to influence millions of people with their words. It is said that a harsh word can wound more deeply than weapons. A gentle word can change the heart and mind of the most hardened criminal. Probably more than anything else, the faculty of speech differentiates man from animals. So if one is to develop a society in which harmony, well-being, communication and cooperation are goals which are to be realized, one must control, cultivate and utilize one’s faculty of speech positively.

All the rules of good conduct involve respect that is founded upon the understanding of equality and reciprocity. In this context, right speech involves respect for truth and respect for the welfare of others. If one speaks with these criteria in mind, one will be cultivating right speech and through this one will achieve greater harmony within society. Traditionally we speak of four aspects of right speech. Right speech means to avoid lying, to avoid back biting or slander, to avoid harsh speech, and to avoid idle talk. Some of you may recall the Buddha’s instruction to Rahula regarding the importance of avoiding lying. He used the example of a vessel. The vessel had a tiny bit of water in the bottom and He asked, “Rahula, see the small amount of water in the bottom of the vessel. Those who are not ashamed of lying, their virtue is small, their renunciation is small like the small amount of water in the vessel.” Then the Buddha threw away the water and said, “those who are not ashamed of lying throw away their virtue just as this water is thrown away.” Then the Buddha showed Rahula the empty vessel and said, “just so empty is the virtue, the renunciation of those who habitually tell lies.”

Thus He used the vessel as a means to illustrate the point that lying is intimately associated with one’s practice of wholesome actions, with one’s good conduct, with one’s character. Once we are confident that we can act in one way and speak in another, then we will not be afraid to act badly, because we will be confident that we can cover up our bad actions by lying. Lying therefore opens the door to all kinds of unwholesome actions. Slander is divisive. It creates quarrels between friends. It creates pain and discord. So just as one would not want to be divided from one’s friend by slander, so ought one not to slander another. So also one ought not to abuse others with harsh words, but on the contrary should speak courteously to others as one would like to be spoken to oneself.

Regarding idle talk, often you hear of people saying that we cannot even indulge in a bit of idle talk. It is not quite that bad. Here the kind of idle talk that is particularly indicated refers to malicious gossips, diverting oneself, entertaining oneself, recounting the faults and failings of others. Rather than use this faculty of speech which is so powerful for deception, for dividing others, for abusing others, for idling away time at the expense of others, why not use it constructively, to communicate meaningfully, to unite others, to encourage understanding between neighbours and friends, and to communicate helpful, meaningful advice. The Buddha once said, “Pleasant speech is as sweet as honey, truthful speech is as beautiful as a flower, and wrong speech is unwholesome and filthy”. So let us try for our own good and that of others to cultivate Right Speech, respect for truth, and respect for the welfare of others.

The next part of the path that falls under good conduct is Right Action. Right Action entails respect for life, respect for property, and respect for personal relationships. We will recall what was said a moment ago about life being dear to all. It is said in the Dharmapada that all tremble at punishment, all fear death, and that all living beings love life. So again, keeping in mind the principles of equality and reciprocity, we ought not to kill living beings. One might be ready to accept this in regard to human beings, but we might demur with regard to other living creatures. Some of the developments that we have seen taking place in the world of science and technology in recent years ought to give the most skeptical free-thinker food for thought. When one destroys a certain strain of insects, is one absolutely sure of accomplishing the greatest good, the long-term good of the environment? Or do we more often than not contribute unwittingly to an imbalance which creates even greater problems in the future?

Respect for property - not to steal from or cheat others. This is important because those who take what is not given, by stealth, by treachery, are as guilty of breaking this precept as those who steal by force. In other words, the employer who does not pay his employee an honest wage that is commensurate with his work is guilty of taking what is not given. Similarly, the employee who collects a salary and shirks his duties is guilty of lack of respect for property.

Finally respect for personal relationships means to avoid adultery, to avoid sexual misconduct. You can see how, if these guidelines are sincerely cultivated within a society, such a society will be a better place to live in.

The third step of the Noble Eightfold Path included in the way of good conduct is Right Livelihood. Right Livelihood is an extension of the rules of Right Action to one’s role as a breadwinner in a society. We have seen that with regard to Right Speech and Right Action the underlying principles behind the rules are respect for truth, life, property and personal relationships. Right Livelihood means that one ought not to earn a living in such a way as to violate these principles which are underlying principles of good conduct. Specifically, there are five kinds of livelihood that are discouraged for Buddhists. These are trading in animals for slaughter, dealing in slaves, dealing in weapons, dealing in poisons, and dealing in intoxicants, those are drugs and alcoholic drinks. These five kinds of livelihood are discouraged because they contribute to the ills of society and because they violate the principles of respect for life and so forth. Dealing in the slaughter of animals violates respect for life. Dealing in slaves violates respect for life and personal relationships. Dealing in deadly weapons violates the principle of respect for life. Dealing in poisons violates the principle of respect for life. Dealing in intoxicants violates the principle of respect for the welfare of others. All these trades contribute to the insecurity, to the suffering and discord in society.

How does good conduct function? We have said that, in regard to society, following the rules of good conduct creates a society characterized by harmony and peace. All social goals can be achieved through the principles and rules of good conduct based upon the fundamental recognition of equality and reciprocity. In addition, the individual also benefits through the practice of good conduct. In one Sutra, the Buddha said, “he who has practised respect for life and so forth, he feels as a king duly crowned and his enemies subdued. He feels at peace, at ease.” The practice of good conduct creates within the individual an inner sense of peace, of stability, of security and of strength. Once he has created that inner peace, he can then fruitfully and successfully practise the other steps of the path. He can cultivate and develop meditation. He can achieve wisdom only when he has created both inwardly and outwardly in his relationships with others and in himself the necessary foundation of good conduct.

Very briefly, these are the origin, contents and goal of good conduct? I would like to touch on one point before I stop today, and that is when people look at the rules of good conduct, they often say how can they possibly follow the rules of good conduct. It is terribly difficult to observe the precepts. For instance, even the precept against taking life can sometimes seem awfully difficult to follow. When you clean up your kitchen, you quite likely may kill some ants. Again, it may seem difficult to always observe the precept of Right Speech. How are we to deal with this problem which is a genuine one? It is not the point whether we can observe all the rules of good conduct all the time. The point is, if the rules of good conduct are well founded, if we can accept that equality and reciprocity are principles we believe in, if we acknowledge that the rules are appropriate to implementing those principles, then it is our duty to practise, to follow the rules of good conduct as much as we can. That is not to say that we will be able to follow the rules absolutely all the time. But it is to say that if we accept that in order to live at peace with ourselves and others, we ought to respect the life of other living beings, respect their property and so forth. And if a situation arises in which we find ourselves unable to apply a particular rule in a particular situation, then that is not the fault of the rule. That simply is the gap between our own practice and the ideal.

When a navigator steers his ship across the ocean by the stars, he is not able to follow precisely the course indicated by the stars. Yet the stars are his guide and by following the stars however inaccurately or approximately, he reaches his destination. In the same way, when we follow the rules of good conduct we do not pretend that we can observe them all the time. This is why for instance the five precepts are called the training precepts and that is why we take them again and again. What we have in the rules of good conduct is a framework through which we can try to live in accord with the fundamental principles that illuminate the Buddhist teachings, the principle of the equality of all living beings and the principle of respect for others.

 By
jagadeesh.k
Mobile: 91-9841121780, 9543187772.
EmaiL: jagadeeshkri@gmail.com
Web: http://www.pinterest.com/jagadeeshkri/books-worth-reading/
Web:http://www.bookbyte.com/searchresults.aspx?type=books&author=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web;http://issuu.com/home/publications
Web:
https://www.morebooks.de/search/gb?utf8=✓&q=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/275-9424466-2127042?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.jp /s/ref=nb_sb_noss/378-4986394-6216105?__mk_ja_JP=カタカナ&url=search- alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
http://www.amazon.es/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?__mk_es_ES=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
my books
http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/180-0191351-1760005?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb;
https://www.peecho.com/dashboard/applications/publications?applicationId=3105.
11:18AM | URL: http://tmblr.co/Zm1NQp1B-4a8y
APRIL 3, 2014

April 18, 2014
Moralities

MORALITY

Last week we completed our survey of the Four Noble Truths and in so doing the last topic that we dealt with was the Noble Eightfold Path to the end of suffering. We used the analogy of mountain climbing when we talked about treading the Eightfold Path to the end of suffering. We have said that just as when one climbs a mountain the first step depends on the last, the last depends on the first because we have to have our eyes firmly fixed on the summit of the mountain and yet we also have to be careful not to stumble while taking the first few steps up to the mountain path. So here in climbing a mountain, each portion of the path depends on the other portions. In this sense, regarding the Noble Eightfold Path, all the steps of the path are interrelated, are dependent on one another. We cannot do away with any one step. Nonetheless, for practical purposes the eight steps of the path have been divided into three ways of practice, or three divisions of training. These three divisions are good conduct or morality (Shila), mental development or meditation (Samadhi) and finally wisdom or insight (Prajna). Although conceptually and structurally, the first step depends upon the last and the last depends upon the first; although they are dependent on one another, still in practical terms when one climbs a mountain one has to climb the lowest slope first. One may be attracted to the summit, but in order to get there one has to cover the lower slope first. It is for this very practical reason that we find the eight steps of the Eightfold Path grouped into these three ways of practice.

The first of these three ways is good conduct. Good conduct forms a foundation for further progress on the path, for further personal development. It is said that just as the earth is the base of all animate and inanimate things, so is morality the foundation of all qualities. When we look around us we can see that everything rests upon the earth, whether it be the building, whether it be the tree and bush, or whether it be the animal. The earth is the foundation, and in the same manner morality is the foundation of all qualities, all virtues, all attainments ranging from the mundane to the supra-mundane, ranging from success, good fortune all the way up to skill in meditation, wisdom and enlightenment. Through this metaphor, we can under-stand the importance of good conduct as a foundation for following the path, as a basis for achieving results on the path.

Why do we take time to stress the importance of good conduct as a foundation for progress on the path? The reason is that there is a tendency to think of good conduct as rather boring, rather dull. Meditation sounds more exciting and interesting. Philosophy has a kind of fascination about it. There is a dangerous tendency to neglect the importance of good conduct and to go to the more exciting parts of the path. But if we do not create this foundation of good conduct, we will not succeed in treading the other parts of the path.

We have to understand the way in which the precepts or the rules of good conduct are established within Buddhism because there are various ways in which moral or ethical codes are established. If you look at the moral codes of the major religions, you will find that there is a surprising correspondence. If you look at the moral teachings of Confucius, of Lao Tzu, of the Buddha, of Hindu teachers, Christians, Muslims, and Jews, you will find that regarding the basic rules of morality, there is a large degree of correspondence. But while the rules in many cases correspond, the attitude, the ways in which the rules are presented, understood and interpreted differ considerably from religion to religion. Essentially, to generalize, there are two ways in which moral codes can be established. One way we might call the authoritarian way, and the other we might call the democratic way. And a good example of the first is God’s handing down the Ten Commandments to Moses on the mountain. On the other hand in Buddhism, I think what we have here might be called a democratic way of establishing the rules of good conduct. You might wonder why I say that. After all we do have the rules of good conduct laid down in scriptures. So you might ask is this not similar to God’s handing down the tablets to Moses? But I think this is not really so because if we look closely at the scriptures, we do find what lies behind the rules of good conduct, and the principles that lie behind that are the foundation of the rules of good conduct, are the principles of equality and reciprocity.

What equality means is that all living beings are equal in their essential attitudes. In other words, all living beings want to be happy. They fear pain, death and suffering. All want to live, to enjoy happiness and security. And this is also true to all living beings just as it is true to ourselves. We can call this equality the great universality of the Buddhist vision in which all living beings are equal. On the basis of this equality, we are encouraged to act with the awareness of reciprocity.

Reciprocity means that just as we would not like to be killed, robbed, abused and so forth, so would all other living beings not like to have these things happen to them. One can put this principle of reciprocity quite simply by saying “do not act towards others in a way which you would not want them to act towards you”. Given these principles of equality and reciprocity, it is not hard to see how they stand behind, how they create the foundation for the rules of good conduct.

Let us now look specifically at the contents of good conduct in Buddhism. The way of practice of good conduct includes three parts of the Noble Eightfold Path, and these three parts are Right Speech, Right Action, and Right Livelihood. Speech is an extremely important part of our life. We often tend to underestimate the power of speech. We often tend to exercise very little control over our faculty of speech. This should not be so. We have all been very greatly hurt by someone’s words at some time of our life. And similarly, we have been encouraged by the words of another. In the sphere of politics, we can see how those who are able to communicate effectively are able to influence people tremendously for better or for worse. Hitler, Churchill, Martin Luther King were all accomplished speakers who were able to influence millions of people with their words. It is said that a harsh word can wound more deeply than weapons. A gentle word can change the heart and mind of the most hardened criminal. Probably more than anything else, the faculty of speech differentiates man from animals. So if one is to develop a society in which harmony, well-being, communication and cooperation are goals which are to be realized, one must control, cultivate and utilize one’s faculty of speech positively.

All the rules of good conduct involve respect that is founded upon the understanding of equality and reciprocity. In this context, right speech involves respect for truth and respect for the welfare of others. If one speaks with these criteria in mind, one will be cultivating right speech and through this one will achieve greater harmony within society. Traditionally we speak of four aspects of right speech. Right speech means to avoid lying, to avoid back biting or slander, to avoid harsh speech, and to avoid idle talk. Some of you may recall the Buddha’s instruction to Rahula regarding the importance of avoiding lying. He used the example of a vessel. The vessel had a tiny bit of water in the bottom and He asked, “Rahula, see the small amount of water in the bottom of the vessel. Those who are not ashamed of lying, their virtue is small, their renunciation is small like the small amount of water in the vessel.” Then the Buddha threw away the water and said, “those who are not ashamed of lying throw away their virtue just as this water is thrown away.” Then the Buddha showed Rahula the empty vessel and said, “just so empty is the virtue, the renunciation of those who habitually tell lies.”

Thus He used the vessel as a means to illustrate the point that lying is intimately associated with one’s practice of wholesome actions, with one’s good conduct, with one’s character. Once we are confident that we can act in one way and speak in another, then we will not be afraid to act badly, because we will be confident that we can cover up our bad actions by lying. Lying therefore opens the door to all kinds of unwholesome actions. Slander is divisive. It creates quarrels between friends. It creates pain and discord. So just as one would not want to be divided from one’s friend by slander, so ought one not to slander another. So also one ought not to abuse others with harsh words, but on the contrary should speak courteously to others as one would like to be spoken to oneself.

Regarding idle talk, often you hear of people saying that we cannot even indulge in a bit of idle talk. It is not quite that bad. Here the kind of idle talk that is particularly indicated refers to malicious gossips, diverting oneself, entertaining oneself, recounting the faults and failings of others. Rather than use this faculty of speech which is so powerful for deception, for dividing others, for abusing others, for idling away time at the expense of others, why not use it constructively, to communicate meaningfully, to unite others, to encourage understanding between neighbours and friends, and to communicate helpful, meaningful advice. The Buddha once said, “Pleasant speech is as sweet as honey, truthful speech is as beautiful as a flower, and wrong speech is unwholesome and filthy”. So let us try for our own good and that of others to cultivate Right Speech, respect for truth, and respect for the welfare of others.

The next part of the path that falls under good conduct is Right Action. Right Action entails respect for life, respect for property, and respect for personal relationships. We will recall what was said a moment ago about life being dear to all. It is said in the Dharmapada that all tremble at punishment, all fear death, and that all living beings love life. So again, keeping in mind the principles of equality and reciprocity, we ought not to kill living beings. One might be ready to accept this in regard to human beings, but we might demur with regard to other living creatures. Some of the developments that we have seen taking place in the world of science and technology in recent years ought to give the most skeptical free-thinker food for thought. When one destroys a certain strain of insects, is one absolutely sure of accomplishing the greatest good, the long-term good of the environment? Or do we more often than not contribute unwittingly to an imbalance which creates even greater problems in the future?

Respect for property - not to steal from or cheat others. This is important because those who take what is not given, by stealth, by treachery, are as guilty of breaking this precept as those who steal by force. In other words, the employer who does not pay his employee an honest wage that is commensurate with his work is guilty of taking what is not given. Similarly, the employee who collects a salary and shirks his duties is guilty of lack of respect for property.

Finally respect for personal relationships means to avoid adultery, to avoid sexual misconduct. You can see how, if these guidelines are sincerely cultivated within a society, such a society will be a better place to live in.

The third step of the Noble Eightfold Path included in the way of good conduct is Right Livelihood. Right Livelihood is an extension of the rules of Right Action to one’s role as a breadwinner in a society. We have seen that with regard to Right Speech and Right Action the underlying principles behind the rules are respect for truth, life, property and personal relationships. Right Livelihood means that one ought not to earn a living in such a way as to violate these principles which are underlying principles of good conduct. Specifically, there are five kinds of livelihood that are discouraged for Buddhists. These are trading in animals for slaughter, dealing in slaves, dealing in weapons, dealing in poisons, and dealing in intoxicants, those are drugs and alcoholic drinks. These five kinds of livelihood are discouraged because they contribute to the ills of society and because they violate the principles of respect for life and so forth. Dealing in the slaughter of animals violates respect for life. Dealing in slaves violates respect for life and personal relationships. Dealing in deadly weapons violates the principle of respect for life. Dealing in poisons violates the principle of respect for life. Dealing in intoxicants violates the principle of respect for the welfare of others. All these trades contribute to the insecurity, to the suffering and discord in society.

How does good conduct function? We have said that, in regard to society, following the rules of good conduct creates a society characterized by harmony and peace. All social goals can be achieved through the principles and rules of good conduct based upon the fundamental recognition of equality and reciprocity. In addition, the individual also benefits through the practice of good conduct. In one Sutra, the Buddha said, “he who has practised respect for life and so forth, he feels as a king duly crowned and his enemies subdued. He feels at peace, at ease.” The practice of good conduct creates within the individual an inner sense of peace, of stability, of security and of strength. Once he has created that inner peace, he can then fruitfully and successfully practise the other steps of the path. He can cultivate and develop meditation. He can achieve wisdom only when he has created both inwardly and outwardly in his relationships with others and in himself the necessary foundation of good conduct.

Very briefly, these are the origin, contents and goal of good conduct? I would like to touch on one point before I stop today, and that is when people look at the rules of good conduct, they often say how can they possibly follow the rules of good conduct. It is terribly difficult to observe the precepts. For instance, even the precept against taking life can sometimes seem awfully difficult to follow. When you clean up your kitchen, you quite likely may kill some ants. Again, it may seem difficult to always observe the precept of Right Speech. How are we to deal with this problem which is a genuine one? It is not the point whether we can observe all the rules of good conduct all the time. The point is, if the rules of good conduct are well founded, if we can accept that equality and reciprocity are principles we believe in, if we acknowledge that the rules are appropriate to implementing those principles, then it is our duty to practise, to follow the rules of good conduct as much as we can. That is not to say that we will be able to follow the rules absolutely all the time. But it is to say that if we accept that in order to live at peace with ourselves and others, we ought to respect the life of other living beings, respect their property and so forth. And if a situation arises in which we find ourselves unable to apply a particular rule in a particular situation, then that is not the fault of the rule. That simply is the gap between our own practice and the ideal.

When a navigator steers his ship across the ocean by the stars, he is not able to follow precisely the course indicated by the stars. Yet the stars are his guide and by following the stars however inaccurately or approximately, he reaches his destination. In the same way, when we follow the rules of good conduct we do not pretend that we can observe them all the time. This is why for instance the five precepts are called the training precepts and that is why we take them again and again. What we have in the rules of good conduct is a framework through which we can try to live in accord with the fundamental principles that illuminate the Buddhist teachings, the principle of the equality of all living beings and the principle of respect for others.

 By
jagadeesh.k
Mobile: 91-9841121780, 9543187772.
EmaiL: jagadeeshkri@gmail.com
Web: http://www.pinterest.com/jagadeeshkri/books-worth-reading/
Web:http://www.bookbyte.com/searchresults.aspx?type=books&author=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web;http://issuu.com/home/publications
Web:
https://www.morebooks.de/search/gb?utf8=✓&q=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/275-9424466-2127042?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.jp /s/ref=nb_sb_noss/378-4986394-6216105?__mk_ja_JP=カタカナ&url=search- alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
http://www.amazon.es/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?__mk_es_ES=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
my books
http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/180-0191351-1760005?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb;
https://www.peecho.com/dashboard/applications/publications?applicationId=3105.
11:18AM | URL: http://tmblr.co/Zm1NQp1B-4a8y
APRIL 3, 2014

April 18, 2014
jagadeesh krishnan

A man of freedom is free of the past. And the man of freedom is also free of the future, because you don’t know what is going to happen the next moment. How can you go on desiring?…
An old man was dying. He was a Jew; and his four sons, who used to live in different houses, were of course immensely rich people. Hearing that their father was dying, they rushed to him.
The father was dying, taking his last breath on the bed, and just sitting by the side of the bed, the sons started discussing how to take his body to the graveyard. Their concern was not the father — a few minutes more and he would be gone, forever; there was no possibility of their meeting or recognizing each other again… but that was not their concern. They were concerned about: “When he dies, how are we going to transport his body?”
The youngest boy suggested, “He always wanted to have a Rolls Royce. And he has enough money, we have enough money; there is no need for him to suffer and repress an innocent desire. So at least we should bring a Rolls Royce to carry his body to the graveyard. In his life he missed, but at least in death he will have the Rolls Royce.”
The second boy said, “You are too young and you don’t understand matters concerning money. It is a sheer wastage. He is dead — whether you take him in a Rolls Royce or in a truck does not matter to him. He will not be able to know, so why waste money?” And it was not much money either, just to hire a Rolls Royce taxi. It was not a question of purchasing it. He said, “My suggestion is that a cheap truck will do as efficiently as any Rolls Royce — for the dead it makes no difference.”
The third boy said, “You are also still immature. Why bother about a truck, when the municipal corporation truck takes, free of charge, any beggar who dies? Just put him out on the road! In the morning the municipal truck, with all kinds of rubbish, will take him for free. Give him a free ride! And what does it matter to a dead man whether it is a municipal truck or a hired truck or a Rolls Royce?”
At that very moment the old man opened his eyes and said, “Where are my shoes?” They were puzzled, “What are you going to do with shoes? Why waste a pair of shoes? Anyway you are going to die.”
He said, “I’m still alive and perhaps have a few more breaths. Just bring the shoes; I will walk to the graveyard. That is the cheapest and the sanest way. You are all extravagant, spendthrift.”
People may have money, and the money becomes their fetter. People may have prestige, and the prestige becomes their fetters. It seems the whole past of humanity has been improving on how to make better chains, but even if a chain is made of gold, it is still a chain. Freedom on the outside is just the politician’s continuous deceiving of the whole humanity.
Freedom is your individual affair.

thanks dear friend 

By
jagadeesh.k
Mobile: 91-9841121780, 9543187772.
EmaiL: jagadeeshkri@gmail.com
Web: http://www.pinterest.com/jagadeeshkri/books-worth-reading/
Web:http://www.bookbyte.com/searchresults.aspx?type=books&author=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web;http://issuu.com/home/publications
Web:
https://www.morebooks.de/search/gb?utf8=✓&q=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/275-9424466-2127042?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
Web: http://www.amazon.co.jp /s/ref=nb_sb_noss/378-4986394-6216105?__mk_ja_JP=カタカナ&url=search- alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
http://www.amazon.es/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?__mk_es_ES=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb:
my books
http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/180-0191351-1760005?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=jagadeesh+krishnan
WEb;
https://www.peecho.com/dashboard/applications/publications?applicationId=3105.
11:18AM | URL: http://tmblr.co/Zm1NQp1B-4a8y
APRIL 3, 2014

April 12, 2014
Please vote for NOTA

jagadeeshkrishnan:

Former Karnataka Chief Minister B.S Yeddyurappa, who had to quit the BJP in the wake of corruption charges and rejoined recently, is among the 52 candidates finalised by the party today for the upcoming Lok Sabha polls.

The second list of candidates covers six states of Karnataka, Odisha,…

April 12, 2014
Please vote for NOTA

Former Karnataka Chief Minister B.S Yeddyurappa, who had to quit the BJP in the wake of corruption charges and rejoined recently, is among the 52 candidates finalised by the party today for the upcoming Lok Sabha polls.

The second list of candidates covers six states of Karnataka, Odisha, Tripura, Kerala, Assam and West Bengal.

Among other prominent leaders fielded by the party include another former Karnataka Chief Minister D V Sadananda Gowda from Bangalore North, party general secretary Ananth Kumar from Bangalore South and journalist-turned-politician Chandan Mitra from Hoogly in West Bengal.

Yeddyurappa will contest from Shimoga in Karnataka, Ananth Kumar told a press conference while announcing the decision taken at the meeting of the party’s Central Election Committee headed by BJP Chief Rajnath Singh, and attended by Narendra Modi, L K Advani and other top leaders.

71-year-old Yeddyurappa had to resign as Chief Minister of the state on August 1, 2011, after a corruption case was lodged against him by the State Lokayukta.

He quit the party in November 2012 and formed his own outfit Karnataka Janata Paksha (KJP), which contested the last assembly polls against the BJP and played a key role in its defeat.

The veteran Lingayat leader from the state, who wields influence on a considerable vote bank in the state, had led BJP to victory in the 2008 assembly elections thus forming the first BJP government in south India.

The BJP had released a list of 54 candidates in its first list on February 27. The next list would be released on March 13.

Odisha

BJP also finalised the list of its 57 candidates for Odisha assembly elections. Odisha will have elections for its 21 Lok Sabha seats and 147-member assembly in two phases on April 10 and 17.

In its second list, BJP finalised five candidates in Assam, 20 in Karnataka, three in Kerala, five in Odisha, two in Tripura and 17 in West Bengal.

In its first list, the party had finalised 17 each in Maharashtra and West Bengal, six in Odisha, five in Jammu and Kashmir, three in Himachal Pradesh and two each in Goa, Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh.

With its second list out, BJP has so far finalised a total of 106 candidates so far.

Among those fielded by the party in Karnataka, where candidates in 20 of the 28 seats have been declared, are sitting MP and state party president Prahlad Joshi from Dharwad. 12 sitting MPs have also been fielded, who include Ramesh Katti from Chikkodi, Suresh Angadi from Belgaum, P C Gaddigoudar from Balghat, Ramesh Jigajinagi from Bijapur (SC), Shivkumari C Udasi from Haveri, Ananth Kumar Hegde from Uttara Kannada, G M Siddeswara from Devanagere, Nalin Kumar Katil from Dakshina Kannada, Janardhana Swamy from Chitradurga (SC) and P C Mohan from Bangalore Central.

Former Ministers B.N Bachhegouda and Revu Naik Belamgi have been fielded from continued…

Who is SONIA GANDHI? ( Every Indian Should Know This )

Who is Sonia Gandhi:
There is officially no Sonia Gandhi. Her real name in passport is neither Gandhi nor Sonia. Its Hedvige Antonia Albina Moina. Sonia is a Russian name and not Italian. However, Antonia is an Italian name and her passport is Italian. Though she has married Rajiv Gandhi* she never accepted change of title officially. ( recall the time of turmoil in Indian politics when Sonia Gandhi was trying to be the prime minister, but ultimately ManMohan Singh became her toy)

*Rajiv Gandhi: Actually Rajiv Khan being the son of Firoz Khan and Indira Priyadarshani. Gandhi is an assumed title to sentimentally lure Indians for their political benefit. They are muslims by religion.

Father:
Stefano Eugene Maino is socially the father of Sonia. Her father was a German(hitlers army). When Hitlers army went to russia they were captured and imprisoned. He was captured near St. Petersburgh and was imprisoned for 20 years. But he became a member of KGB and his imprisonment was limited to 4 years. When he came back from prison he gave russian name to his daughters. Social father because when she was born her father was in jail for 4 years. Biological father is unconfirmed.

Mother:
Paula Maino.
Family:
She had 2 sisters in Orbassano, italy
Birthplace
Sonia claims she was born in Besano, near Turin in italy. However, as per her birth certificate, She is actually born is Luciana, in the borders of Switzerland. A resort town for German soldiers during war.

Education:
She initially put forward to Indian Govt. that she studied in Cambridge University which proved to be fake. She submitted an affidavit that she studied English in Bell Education trust at Cambridge. Even this was proven to be fake and was found she never got any education after class five. She was a young girl with no formal education living five years in England. How did she support her livelihood for 5 years? Any wild guesses?

Citizenship:
She has not given off her Italian citizenship. Indira Gandhi used her power to issue her an Indian Citizenship so that she can join Indian politics. She is holding an illegal citizenship in India. No action is being taken by Home Minister.

Religion:
Christianity.

Bank Balance:
Rajiv Gandhi and his family owned 2 billion USD in Swiss Bank as of November,1991. Benefitiary of death of Indira Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi was Sonia Gandhi.

Family:
Sonia’s sister Alexandria(or Anuska) has 2 shops in Italy selling antiques stolen from India. Sonia used her power to smuggle indian artifacts through Air India flights uninspected.

Sonia’s son Rahul Gandhi, whose real name is Raul Vinci. He got admitted to Harvard in quota but was thrown off soon because he was incompetant. He has italian citizenship since his mother never gave up her citizenship. He cannot officially become the citizen of india or any politician in india as long as he doesnt give up his italian citizenship. Arrested in Boston airport for carrying 160,000 dollars cash, accompanied by Veronique (spanish). veronique is the daughter of Drug mafia leader.

( Rahul Gandhi ) has also been accused for gang raping ( Sukanya Devi ) whose petition to all courts in India have been rejected due to their political hold and the whereabouts of the family is unknown. 
However, the information is widely available online.

**********Friends PLEASE DO SHARE this information with the people because only general awareness can cure this nation and the corrupt government will never reveal the truth

Sources- Dr Subramanian Swamy raises question
http:www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAFXMO53d4w

………………….

திருமணத்தை மறைத்த மோடிக்கு பிரதமராக தகுதி இல்லை” என்கிறார் கருணாநிதி.

ஒருவனுக்கு ஒருத்தி என்கிற இந்திய சட்டத்தில் சந்து பொந்து ஓட்டைகள் தேடி திருமணம் செய்தவரை ‘மனைவி’ என்றும், வைப்பாட்டியை ‘துணைவி’ என்றும் பெருமிதமாகவும் துணிச்சலாகவும் பேச கருணாநிதி போன்ற ஒரு சில அரசியல்வாதிகளால்தான் முடியும்.

திருமணம் செய்து கொண்ட மனைவியை துரத்திவிட்டு வேறு பெண்களுக்கு ‘ரூட்’ விட மோடி போன்ற பல அரசியல்வாதிகளால் முடியும்.

இப்படிப்பட்ட ஆண்கள் செய்தது நேர்மையா? நேர்மையற்றதா? என்கிற விமர்சனம் வரும்பொழுதெல்லாம் ‘அது அவர்கள் தனிப்பட்ட வாழ்க்கை’ என்று அலட்சியமாய் பேசவும் பல ஆண்களும் இருக்கத்தான் செய்கிறார்கள். பெண்களின் நிலை குறித்து யாரும் விவாதிப்பதில்லை. இதுதான் ஆணாதிக்க சமூகச் சிந்தனை. இந்தியா முழுவதிலும் பல ஆண்களிடம் பரவியுள்ள தொற்றுநோய்!

நேற்று சமாஜ்வாதி கட்சித் தலைவர் ‘முலாயம் சிங் யாதவ்’, “பையன்கள் என்றால் தவறு செய்வார்கள்; அதற்காக ஏன் அவர்களை தூக்கிலிட வேண்டும்?” என்று கேள்வி எழுப்பினார். தூக்கு தண்டனைக்கு எதிராக அதை கூறவில்லை. “ஆம்பளைங்கன்னா ஆயிரம் பண்ணுவோம். நீ இன்னா பண்ணுவ”ன்னு கேட்கிற ஆம்பள திமீரு தான் இருந்தது.

இன்று அதேக் கட்சியைச் சேர்ந்த மகாராஷ்ட்ரா மாநில தலைவர் ‘அபு ஆஸ்மி’ கூறுகிறார்:

"கற்பழிப்புக்கு உள்ளாகும் பெண்ணையும் தூக்கிலிட வேண்டும்."

"வேறு ஆணுடன் செக்ஸ் வைத்துக்கொள்ளும் பெண்ணை தூக்கிலிட வேண்டும்."

இதில் முலாயம் சிங் யாதவ் இந்துஸ்தானி மனநிலையிலும், அபு ஆஸ்மி ஆப்கானிஸ்தானி மனநிலையிலும் மதவாத / மிதவாத போக்கோடு பெண்களை ஒடுக்கவும் இழிபடுத்தவும் நம் சமூகத்தில் இருக்கும் சக ஆணின் மனநிலையை வெளிப்படுத்துகிறார்கள். பொறுப்பான ஜனநாயக மக்களாட்சியின் அரசியல் நிலைப்பாடுகளில் இருந்து கொண்டு பெண்களுக்கு எதிராக வன்முறைவாதத்தை கக்குகிறார்கள். சமூகநீதியையும் / சமத்துவ உரிமையையும் பிழைப்புவாதமாக்குகிறார்கள்.

தேர்தல் பிரசாரத்தில் இவை போன்ற பெண் அடிமைத்தன கருத்தாக்கத்தை வலியுறுத்துபவர்கள் மீது தேர்தல் ஆணையத்திடம் புகார் கொடுக்க இந்திய சமூக அமைப்புகள் முயல வேண்டும்!

Why #Indian #Women Must Vote #NOTA in the 2014 #Election

APRIL 6, 2014

tags: DowrywomenGendercideIndiaThe 50 Million Missing CampaignviolenceGovernmentHuman rightsviolence against womenrapepoliticswomen’s rightsVoteGenderreligion,KashmirSonia GandhirightsCongressBJPelections,#Election2014NOTAagendaelectoralAAPSPNarendra Modi,Gujarat 2002Sikhs 1984khaps

WHAT IS NOTA?

 

NOTA is a voting option provided to Indian citizens for the first time in the April 07- May 12, 2014 elections.  NOTA stands for “None of The Above.” When a voter presses the NOTA button they will indicate that they are rejecting all the political partiesand their candidates standing for this election.

WHY HAS THE SUPREME COURT PROVIDED THE NOTA OPTION?  

Over the last two decades there has been serious concern about the escalating presence of criminals in Indian government and political parties.  With each election the inclusion of these criminals increases.  In the 2004 election, 24% of Members of Parliament (MPs) had pending criminal charges against them. In the 2009 election their numbers had risen to 30%with a majority of these cases carrying serious charges of rape, murder, extortion and other forms ofviolence against women, such as molestations, stalking, and dowry related violence and/or murder. The state wise breakdown of criminal politicians reveals some appalling statistics.  For e.g, currently 50% of MPs from the state of Jharkhand, and 48% of MPs from the state of Maharashtra are facing criminal charges.

Criminals running the Indian government have little incentive to see laws implemented for the protection of women and other citizens.  Indeed there is immense political pressure and maneuvering to allow for crimes to flourish.  It has been often observed that rape and other violent crimes against women are almost “enjoyed” as a political “perks” by the system.

Recently the Supreme Court attempted to clean out criminals from government but faced immense resistance.  The ruling party, the Congress, actually tried to force through an Ordinance to snub the Supreme Court initiative.

In providing the NOTA button as a voting option to Indian citizens, the Supreme Court of India has actually expressed its helplessness in cleaning the government of crime and criminals.  In its statement the Court said, When a large number of voters will press NOTA button, it will force political parties to choose better candidates.”

HOW DO I LOCATE THE NOTA BUTTON?

 

The NOTA button is easy to locate.  It will ALWAYS be the very LAST button on theelectronic voting machine’s list of candidates.  It will read “None of the Above – NOTA.”  See the diagram to you left.

HOW ARE ALL POLITICAL PARTIES ANTI-WOMEN?

ALL PARTIES BLATANTLY RECRUIT RAPISTS AND MURDERERS:Every single party running for election this year has an increase in politicians with criminal backgrounds.  Of the two largest parties, 48 MPs from the Congress party, and 46 MPs from the BJP have pending criminal charges.  Smaller parties like the Shiv Sena have 8, but given that they have only 10 MPs, it means 80% of their politicians have criminal charges.  A majority of these MPs are wanted for serious crimes like rape and murder.

ALL PARTIES COLLUDE WITH FORUMS THAT SYSTEMATICALLY OPPRESS WOMEN:These forums include religious bodies and leaders, like Asaram(charged with rapes and sexual molestations of girls), Ram Dev (who openly advocates methods to procure sons instead of daughters), and Muslim leaders (likeMaulana Tauqeer Raza )who impose fatwas on women who oppose their fundamentalist, anti-women diktats.  All political parties also form alliances withkhap panchayats(village councils)that are notorious for holding kangaroo courts and meting out extra-judicial punishments like “honor killings,” and gang rapes.

TOP LEADERSHIPS ARE ACCOUNTABLE IN CASES OF SERIOUS INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CRIMES:The leader and/or prime ministerial candidate of the two largest parties, the Congress and the BJP, are also responsible for directly colluding in, or protecting those responsible for the systematic massacre and mass rapes of minority communities.  In2002, there was a systematic and planned attack on Muslims in Gujaratand thousands were killed, raped and rendered homeless.Narendra Modi, the man who was the chief minister of Gujarat at that time and has been implicated as being directly collusive by many in his own administration, is the BJP’s choice of Prime Minister for India.  Though many in Modi’s government were found guilty, Modi continues to evade justice despite numerous testimonies against him.  A similar,systematic attack on Sikhs took place in Delhi in 1984, when thousands were killed, raped and rendered homeless, with the then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi’s implicit collusion.  Gandhi’s henchman who were known to organize the massacre and rapes continue to be protected by Sonia Gandhi, widow of Rajiv Gandhi, and the current leader of the Congress party.  Indeed Mrs. Gandhi even rewards and empowers these politicians through political positions. Human rights groups who’ve found their cases blocked repeated in Indian courts are now trying to have Sonia Gandhi tried for obstructing justice and sheltering these human rights criminals through a New York court.

ALL PARTIES OPENLY ACCOMODATE POLITICIANS WHO BLATANTLY UNDERMINE WOMEN’S RIGHTS: Some party leaders like Mamta Banerjee of the TMC party have repeatedlyblamed women rape victims, as have other members of her party, even as the state she governs now ranks No. 1 in rapes and other violent crimes against women.  Parties like the SP in Uttar Pradesh, a state with one of the highest rates of rape, have promised men that they will ‘tone down’ rape laws if they win this election! The law minister of the newly formed AAP Party led a lynch mob to the homes of African women in Delhi, and violated the law he was supposed to uphold by demanding the police against all legal protocols, arrest the women because the mobs believed them to be prostitutes.

WHY ALL INDIAN WOMEN MUST VOTE ‘NOTA’

India today is the 4th most dangerous country for women in the world.  But since the other three countries have mass civil unrest, it makes India the most dangerous democracy for women in the world.

India has systematically exterminated 20% of womenthrough infliction of every form of violence.  This also reflects in the drop in percentage of new women voters, which now stands at about 40% of the voting pool,  with 60% being men.  This is a message to the women of India, that there is no place for them in this country.  They will not even be allowed to survive!  It is a genocide that is globally unprecedented.

So why haven’t the women of India found a united and strong voice and momentum to protest and resist this genocidal violence across the board in the country?

Perhaps because Indian women are so trapped in their identities of region, caste, class, clan, and religion that they’ve lost sight of their identity as ‘women.’ Are Indian women so lost, that they cannot see that the violence that’s exterminating them through infanticide, dowry murders, honor killings and rapes is affecting them all? 

Do Indian women see that no other human group in India has been exterminated by violence to the degree that women have been?

Perhaps the blame lies with political parties who deviously use the caste, class and religion cards to cause discordance among people. Perhaps the blame lies even with India’s liberals who defend human rights of one group but remain silent about the human rights violation of another and thus cause divide among people. When Nobel LaureateAmartya Sen said he would not vote for the BJP and Modi because we have to protect Muslim minorities, he needed to have also emphasized that he would not vote for the Congress because we have to protect Sikh minorities.  Instead he defended Sonia Gandhi! Indeed we need to protect all human rights, regardless!  When social activist Arundhati Roy spoke out against the rapes of Muslim women in Kashmir by the Indian army, she needed to have also spoken out against the systematic rapes and murders of the minority Hindus and Sikhs in Kashmir which forced their mass exodus.  Indeed she needed to have also spoken out against the control of Taliban in Kashmir that’s increasing its oppressive diktats against women, forcing them to wear veils, threatening acid attacks if they wear jeans, sing, dance or go to school.

All women are human.  And as such we all have human rights.  It does not matter which group violates those rights, or which group a woman whose rights are violated, belongs to.  One woman’s oppression is every woman’s oppression.   

As women we cannot afford to silently submit to this violence and extermination by India and its criminal system of government.  For this to change, the women of India must unite and make our demand for security and freedom in ONE VOICE!  

SO INDIAN SISTERS, PLEASE LET US UNITE!

IN ONE UNITED VOICE LET US SEND A CLEAR MANDATE!

LET’S TELL THE PARTIES THAT WE WILL NOT TOLERATE RAPISTS AND MURDERERS IN GOVERNMENT ANY MORE!

LET US USE THE NOTA MANDATE TO SEND THAT MESSAGE TO INDIAN LEADERS!

LET US INDIAN WOMEN USE NOTA TO UNITE SO WE CAN END THE VIOLENCE AND FEAR THAT WE ALL ARE LIVING WITH!

REMEMBER NOTA IS THE LAST BUTTON IN THE LIST OF OPTIONS ON THEVOTING MACHINE!

WHEN YOU PRESS THE NOTA BUTTON, THINK ‘MY VOTE WILL MAKE INDIA SAFER FOR ALL WOMEN.’

April 12, 2014
Why #Indian #Women Must Vote #NOTA in the 2014 #Election

April 8, 2014
Buddha

April 5, 2014
Lokasabha Candidates of Aam Aadmi Party for Election 2014

April 3, 2014
jagadeesh krishnan Psychologist and International Author

jagadeeshkrishnan:

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

imageimage

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

My own approach about it was always this:

whenever my father will ask me anything I will ask him another question…

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »